BIOL 100 - EXPLORING THE LIVING WORLD:

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe levels of organization and related functions in plants and animals.
  • Identify the characteristics and basic needs of living organisms and ecosystems.
  • Explain the processes of growth and development in individuals and populations.
  • Design and critically assess the scientific investigations they perform.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills.

BIOL 110 - LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE:

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the major steps in the evolution of main sequence stars of various masses and the planets and other bodies surrounding those stars.
  • Define clearly what is meant by "life" and "living organisms".
  • Understand the relationship between stellar mass, the width of the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ), stellar lifetime, and the suitability of planets to sustain organic evolution.
  • Describe the stages of geological and biological evolution on Earth and contrast those stages to those on other terrestrial planets and satellites in our solar system.
  • Explain why biology on Earth is based on the chemistry of carbon and analyze the potential for biology based on other elements.
  • Evaluate the progress made to date on identifying exosolar planets, particularly those with the potential to have Earth-like surface conditions.
  • Evaluate the progress made to date in Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) research programs.
  • Analyze the challenges associated with interstellar travel and assess the probability that Earth has been visited by alien civilizations.

 BIOL 170 - FOUNDATIONS OF LIFE SCIENCE:

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe levels of organization and related functions in plants and animals.
  • Identify the characteristics and basic needs of living organisms and ecosystems.
  • Explain the processes of growth and development in individuals and populations.
  • Design and critically assess the scientific investigations they perform.
  • Identify the crucial role of life science in planning K-6 curricula.
  • Evaluate student progress using guided inquiries.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills.

BIOL 200 - PRINCIPLES OF ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY:

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Define basic biological concepts and processes.
  • Describe levels of organization and related functions in plants and animals.
  • Identify the characteristics and basic needs of living organisms.
  • Explain the processes of growth and development in individuals and populations.
  • Describe the relationships between organisms and their environment.
  • Identify impacts on ecosystems.

BIOL 201 - PRINCIPLES OF CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Outline the structure of the biomolecules found in all living organisms.
  • Describe the function and structure of cells including the metabolic reactions that occur in cells.
  • Explain the process of inheritance.
  • Describe how RNA, DNA and proteins are synthesized.
  • Explain the process of cell division in both somatic and germ cells.
  • Explain the processes by which animals acquire nutrients, water and oxygen, eliminate wastes, protect against foreign substances, acquire information about their environment and reproduce.
  • Generate a hypothesis from a set of observations and then design experiments to test the hypothesis.

BIOL 203 - QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Choose an appropriate sampling scheme and/or experimental design for a given biological question.
  • Select and apply the appropriate analytical methods to biological data.
  • Demonstrate the necessary computer skills for biological data management, analysis and graphical presentation.
  • Evaluate critically the primary literature in observation and experimental biology.

BIOL 210 - HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the function and structure of cells.
  • Identify and distinguish between tissues in the human body.
  • Explain the structure and function of organ systems in the human body.

BIOL 211 - HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the function and structure of cells.
  • Identify and distinguish between tissues in the human body.
  • Explain the structure and function of organ systems in the human body.

BIOL 212 - NEUROBIOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the structure and function of cells that comprise the nervous system.
  • Explain chemical and electrical signaling in the nervous system.
  • Outline the sensory and motor systems.
  • Explain brain development and complex brain functions.
  • Generate a hypothesis from a set of observations and then suggest experiments to test the hypothesis.

BIOL 213 - SEX, GERMS AND DISEASES

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the reproductive system of humans.
  • Define factors in the spread of infectious diseases.
  • Explain biology and pathogenesis of infectious agents that cause sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Describe current biotechnology in relation to vaccine development, treatment and improved diagnostics of these diseases.
  • Identify challenges of epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases to economy, public health system, individuals, and society at large.

BIOL 217 - MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe disease-causing microorganisms and microbial agents at organismal, cellular and/or molecular levels.
  • Relate normal cellular and molecular structures to their functions.
  • Explain cellular processes and mechanisms that lead to physiological functions and pathological state.
  • Demonstrate the ability to handle situations and incidents at medical settings involving potential pathogens.
  • Apply modern biological techniques to identify potential pathogens and solve aspects of scientific problems.

BIOL 220 - STEM CELL TECHNOLOGY, APPLICATIONS AND SOCIAL IMPACT

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Understand the basic concepts of a cell and its role in development and formation of an embryo.
  • Explain what stem cells are and their potential applications.
  • Describe the techniques involved in creating, maintaining and studying stem cells.
  • Discuss social and ethical issues and impact of stem cell technology.
  • Outline the laws and regulations of stem cell technology.
  • Describe the significance of stem cell technology and application in medicine and public health.

BIOL 300 - CELL BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe cytological, biochemical, physiological and genetic aspects of the cell, including cellular processes common to all cells, to all eucaryotic cells as well as processes in certain specialized cells.
  • Relate normal cellular structures to their functions.
  • Explain cellular processes and mechanisms that lead to physiological functions as well as examples of pathological state.
  • Apply modern cellular techniques to solve aspects of scientific problems.
  • Describe the intricate relationship between various cellular structures and their corresponding functions.

BIOL 301 - MICROBIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe cellular, biochemical, and physiological aspects of mircoorganisms and recognize the similarities and differences between microbial groups (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, viruses, viroids, and prions).
  • Explain cellular and biochemical processes involved in pathogenesis (human-pathogen interactions).
  • Identify microorganisms and their role in various environments.
  • Describe the cultural use of microorganisms in food production, medicine, fuel production, and waste treatment.
  • Apply microbiology techniques (cell culture, chemical and molecular based methods) to solve scientific problems.

BIOL 302 - GENETICS

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Apply quantitative problem-solving skills to genetics problems and issues.
  • Demonstrate their ability to reason both inductively and deductively with experimental information and data.
  • Describe the chromsome theory, molecular genetics and quantitative and evolutionary genetics.
  • Select and apply experimental procedures to solve genetic problems.

BIOL 303 - EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the theory of natural selection.
  • Explain how new species arise.
  • Construct a phylogenetic tree.
  • Explain the mechanisms which underlie evolution at the molecular level.

BIOL 304 - COMPARATIVE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe metabolic reactions which occur in cells.
  • Compare the structure and function of organ systems in a variety of animal phyla.
  • Explain how animals adapt to fluctuating environmental conditions.
  • Outline the steps involved in transmission of nerve impulses.

BIOL 305 - BIOLOGY OF AGING

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theories of aging.
  • Apply different measurement for age-related changes in populations and individuals.
  • Interpret the evolutionary and comparative aspects of longevity and senescence.
  • Describe the various research models used to study aging.
  • Report and analyze the research discoveries in aging.
  • Explain the mechanisms underlying the aging processes.

BIOL 310 - VERTEBRATE BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain vertebrate evolution from protovertebrates to higher mammals.
  • Describe vertebrate classification.
  • Apply the biology of vertebrates to basic physiological, evolutionary and ecological concepts.
  • Identify major vertebrate groups and describe their salient features.
  • Explain the impact of human activities on vertebrate animals in natural communities.

BIOL 311 - PLANT BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify and describe the structural features of plants.
  • Discuss the basic processes of plant metabolism, transport, nutrition, growth, and reproduction.
  • Describe major evolutionary lineages of plants and their defining characteristics.
  • Identify plant species important in local ecosystems.
  • Describe the cultural uses of plants for food, fiber, medicine, biotechnology, etc.
  • Discuss plants in the context of broader environmental concerns, such as climate change, habitat destruction, pollution, invasive species, and agriculture.

BIOL 312 - MARINE BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify organisms residing in the Southern California intertidal zone.
  • Explain the structure and function of marine ecosystems.
  • Describe the chemical and physical features of seawater and the world's oceans.
  • Describe organisms residing in the marine environment.
  • Generate a hypothesis from a set of observations and then design experiments to test the hypothesis.

BIOL 313 - CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe methods of how resources are valued.
  • Critically analyze the factors involved in the historical evolution of conservation.
  • Analyze the general scientific bases of conservation.
  • Analyze conservation management as a land use strategy.
  • Critically assess relationships between human and scientific perspectives on conservation.
  • Critically assess the applications of key theories in population and evolutionary ecology to scientific conservation.
  • Assess methods of measuring biodiversity.
  • Analyze the nature reserve concept in relation to conservation objectives.

BIOL 315 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain the basic concepts and principles of physics and their applications to biological systems.
  • Apply problem-solving skills to practical problems within the life sciences.
  • Choose appropriate biophysical methods to characterize biological systems and appreciate their limitations.
  • Analyze complex issues in biophysics using modeling.
  • Use a variety of simulation programs, featuring data analysis and display, to derive conclusions about experimental situations.
  • Critically evaluate scientific and medical literature.
  • Organize and express ideas clearly and convincingly in oral and written forms.

BIOL 316 - INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain the evolution of animal body plans from simple to complex.
  • Describe the classification system of invertebrate animals.
  • Apply basic physiological and ecological concepts to invertebrate animals.
  • Identify major invertebrate groups, and describe their key characteristics.
  • Identify human impacts on invertebrate populations, and the ecosystems in which they live.

BIOL 317 - PARASITOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain basics of the parastic life-mode in context of ecological and evolutionary forces.
  • Apply basic physiological, evolutionary and ecological concepts to parastic relationships.
  • Identify major parastic groups, and describe their key characteristics.
  • Describe the impact of parastic infections on human health and history.
  • Explain medical and public health aspects of human parastic infections.

BIOL 318 - MEDICAL MYCOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe how and why fungi impact our lives.
  • Determine how molds differ from other microbes/ bacteria.
  • Classify molds.
  • Identify characteristics of the major fungal groups.
  • Identify major types of pathogenic species.
  • Identify disease(s) produced.
  • State the major features of fungal pathology

BIOL 319 - PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND IDENTIFICATION

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the biological basis of plant classification.
  • Recognize the major plant families of North America by sight.
  • Recognize ecologically and economically important California plant species by sight.
  • Identify unknown plant species using dichotomous keys.
  • Employ diverse taxonomic resources for plant identification, including electronic and print media, reference materials, and herbarium collections.
  • Discuss current questions in plant evolution and classification.

BIOL 320 - DEEP-SEA BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify organisms in the deep-sea.
  • Differentiate ecosystems in the deep-sea, and describe key features (abiotic and biotic conditions).
  • Analyze specialized biological adaptations to extreme pressure, temperature, light, and other conditions.
  • Apply these general biological adaptations to design a theoretical organism evolved in the deep-sea.
  • Explain the current and projected anthropogenic impacts on deep-sea ecosystems.
  • Describe the history, technology, and major expeditions to explore the deep-sea.

BIOL 326 - SCIENTIFIC AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the major elements of ethical theory.
  • Analyze and present results of complex ethics cases.
  • Prepare and give effective oral presentations about ethical issues.
  • Conduct research and write a 1000 word paper on an aspect of ethics.

BIOL 332 - CANCER AND SOCIETY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Apply inductive and deductive reasoning to evaluate the biological mechanisms that lead to the induction of cancer.
  • Assess the contribution of environmental and genetic factors to cancer causation.
  • Describe the latest techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.
  • Identify public health issues and concerns attributable to cancer.
  • Evaluate realistically information derived from current literature, news media and on-line sources on the causes, prevention and treatment of cancer.

BIOL 333 - EMERGING PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify public health issues and concerns.
  • Assess contributing environmental and behavioral factors and infectious agents that lead to emerging infectious diseases and health problems.
  • Describe the reasons of the above factors that lead to public health problems and concerns.
  • Explain the mechanisms utilized by the microbial agents to cause emerging infectious diseases.
  • Critically assess the psychological, societal and economical impact of public health crises on human populations in their communities, countries and ie world.

BIOL 335 - THE BIOSPHERE

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain how life evolved on the planet.
  • Delineate how endosymbiosis can explain the origin of eucaryotic cells.
  • Describe the structure and composition of the atmosphere.
  • Differentiate between short- and long-term climate change and explain how these changes arise.
  • Describe how earth's resources are utilized by humans and the resultant impacts on the environment.

BIOL 342 - THE ZOO: CONSERVATION, EDUCATION AND RECREATION

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the roles of biology, business, economics and education within the zoo.
  • Analyze the interactions of biology, business, economics and education in a zoo. This analysis will include the ways that these disciplines complement and conflict with one another.
  • Reflect in written and oral form on the zoo as a social institution and the role of the zoo in contemporary society.
  • Describe the processes of collecting and displaying flora and fauna in zoos.
  • Analyze the development of a zoo collection.
  • Describe the effects of the macroeconomy on a zoo.

BIOL 345 - SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Discuss news media depictions of scientific policy issues.
  • Discuss the science that underpins major issues of public policy covered in class.
  • Distinguish high quality scientific research from writing that is opinion or ideology driven.
  • Evaluate claims made by policy makers regarding the scientific merit of public policies.
  • Describe the US science policy making process and evaluate the role of interest groups in decision making.
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantates of major public policy decisions.
  • Present scientific information in a format understandable by policy makers.
  • Locate serious scientific scholarship on issues of public importance

 BIOL 389 - THE SCIENCE OF ART AND THE ART OF SCIENCE

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Recognize, translate and breakdown key scientific concepts and processes into aesthetic and informative art using artistic media and multimedia applications.
  • Explore the relationships between art and science in an artistic and biological framework.
  • Observe and identify taxonomically important physical traits in plants, animals and microbes and then generate accurate, representative illustrations and animations of the subject matter.
  • Develop artistic skills that effectively illustrate both varied biological creatures and scientific concepts.
  • Combine biological and artist media developed to educate others about science.

BIOL 400 - MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Apply problem-solving skills to biological problems and issues.
  • Write up the results of an experimental study in a lab report.
  • Demonstrate their ability to reason both inductively and deductively with experimental information and data.
  • Explain the function, replication and evolution of genomes.
  • Select and apply experimental procedures to solve biological problems.

BIOL 401 - BIOTECHNOLOGY AND RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNIQUES

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe biocatalysis, pathway engineering, bioprocess control and downstream processing.
  • Demonstrate their ability to reason both inductively and deductively with experimental information and data.
  • Explain the theory and practice of recombinant DNA technology.
  • Select and apply experimental procedures to the spectrum of fields making use of biotechnology.

BIOL 404 - PLANT AND ANIMAL TISSUE CULTURE

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Grow, maintain, and propagate specific plant and animal cell types in a sterile environment.
  • Handle, store and identify cells in culture.
  • Count, identify and assess viability of cells by microscopic examination.
  • Identify the problems associated with growing, storing and identifying a wide range of different cell types.
  • Describe how cell culture can be used for in vitro studies and commercial applications.
  • Analyze data using appropriate techniques .
  • Construct an accurate record of their laboratory work, in the form of a lab notebook including time plans and reports of their activities.
  • Produce a report of their work, which employs a range of skills of written expression and uses appropriate vocabulary consisting of a practical report.

BIOL 405 - BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Model and analyze simple bioreactor systems, including chemostats and enzyme batch reactors, using first principles models.
  • Analyze metabolic pathway models for application to chemostat reaction systems.
  • Design procedures from expression of foreign genes in E. coli using principles of cellular chemistry.
  • Develop a historical exposition of biotechnology.
  • Analyze batch bioreactor data.
  • Evaluate separations systems for cell separation and purification of intracellular and secreted compounds from bacterial and animal cell cultures.

BIOL 406 - EVOLUTIONARY BIOGEOGRAPHY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Relate patterns in current species distributions to past geological and climatic events.
  • Describe Earth's major biogeographic regions.
  • Contrast the biotic and abiotic processses that govern species ranges.
  • Distinguish between models of dispersal and vicariance for disjunct species distributions.
  • Interpret an area cladogram.
  • Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the theory of island biogeography.

BIOL 407 - BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain the influence of natural selection on behavior.
  • Describe and give examples of reproductive behaviors and mating strategies employed by animals.
  • Explain coorporative and competive behavioral interactions.
  • Define eusociality and explain the costs and benefits of this strategy.

BIOL 416 - RADIOBIOLOGY AND RADIONUCLIDES

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain the basic concepts and principles of radiation physics
  • Explain the genetic effects of ionizing radiation.
  • Calculate radiation doses and estimate risk.
  • Use a variety of simulation programs, featuring data analysis and display, to derive conclusions about radiation exposure and dose.
  • Explain the principles of radiation protection.
  • Explain the principles of operation of various radiation detectors.
  • Critically evaluate scientific and medical literature.
  • Organize and express ideas clearly and convincingly in oral and written forms.

BIOL 420 - CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify major components of the immune system at organ, cellular and molecular levels.
  • Discuss normal functions of these components during immune responses.
  • Elucidate the relationship between major cellular and molecular components of the immune system.
  • Explain adverse functions of these cellular and molecular components during abnormal circumstances.
  • Describe mechanisms of diseases associated with adverse functions of the immune system.
  • Apply immunologic techniques to solve certain clinical and research problems.

BIOL 421 - VIROLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the general properties of viruses.
  • Differentiate viruses from other types of microbial agents.
  • Elucidate the mechanisms viruses use to replicate in their hosts.
  • Explain the pathogenic mechanisms of viral diseases.
  • Describe immune defense mechanisms used by the host to fight against viral agents.
  • Describe the concept, practice and significance of immunization.
  • Identify major diagnostic techniques used to assess viruses in various specimens.
  • Name major pathogenic viruses and the diseases they cause.
  • Apply the knowledge learned from this course to prevent viral infections.

BIOL 422 - PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how water moves in plants at both molecular and organismal levels.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the biochemical processes of photosynthesis, glycolysis, citric acid cycle, and electron transport.
  • Use simple laboratory skills in scientific measurements.
  • Write a scientific research paper.

BIOL 423 - CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR NEUROBIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the function and structure of cells comprising the nervous system.
  • Explain, at the molecular level, chemical and electrical signaling in the nervous system.
  • Explain how genes are regulated in the nervous system.
  • Generate a hypothesis from a set of observations and then design experiments to test the hypothesis.

BIOL 424 - HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the function and structure of cells including the metabolic reactions that occur in cells.
  • Outline, at the molecular level, the transmission of signals in excitable cells.
  • Explain the structure and function of organ systems in the human body.

BIOL 425 - HUMAN GENETICS

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Apply quantitative problem-solving skills to human genetics problems and issues.
  • Evaluate biological factors that influence human heredity.
  • Demonstrate their ability to reason both inductively and deductively with experimental information and data.
  • Explain the molecular and biochemical basis, diagnosis and treatment of genetic disease.
  • Select and apply experimental procedures to genetic screening.

BIOL 426 - HEMATOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify the morphology and functions of normal blood cells.
  • Describe blood cell differentiation and metabolism.
  • Explain pathogenesis of  hematologic diseases.
  • Apply clinical diagnostic technology to identify normal and diseased blood cells.
  • Identify the psychological and societal impact of epidemic blood diseases.
  • Explain the impact of pandemic human blood diseases on world civilization and economy.

BIOL 427 - DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Outline and compare the developmental stages which occur in a variety of animal phyla.
  • Explain the mechanisms which lead to cell determination.
  • Describe the evolutionary conservation of developmental mechanisms.
  • Generate a hypothesis from a set of observations and then design experiments to test the hypothesis.

BIOL 428 - BIOLOGY OF CANCER

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Evaluate biological factors that influence human cancer.
  • Demonstrate their ability to reason both inductively and deductively with experimental information and data.
  • Explain the molecular and biochemical basis, diagnosis and treatment of cancer.
  • Select and apply experimental procedures to cancer screening and therapy.

BIOL 431 - BIOINFORMATICS

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the flow and regulation of biological information.
  • Describe the techniques used to collect sequence and expression data.
  • Identify appropriate biological data bases for specific analyses.
  • Manipulate on-line resources appropriately.
  • Analyze gene expression and interpret its significance.
  • Manage bioinformatics tools.
  • Apply appropriate statistical methods to determine sequence similarities.

BIOL 432 - PRINCIPLES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Determine circumstances under which disease occurs or health prevails in human populations.
  • Identify environmental health issues in local communities, society at large and in the world.
  • Select and apply experimental procedures to solve epidemiological problems.
  • Apply quantitative problem-solving skills to public health problems and environmental health issues.
  • Reason both inductively and deductively with experimental, demographic information and data.
  • Apply the knowledge and skills learned from this course in managing and planning health and environmental systems.

BIOL 433 - ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe plant and animal distribution patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic factors.
  • Define the essential characteristics underlying natural ecosystems.
  • Explain model population and community-level dynamics.
  • Interpret and present ecological results.
  • Identify global environmental problems.

BIOL 434 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL IMAGING

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain the principles and basic concepts of five clinical imaging modalities.
  • Analyze the images in terms of the structure and function of the organs imaged.
  • Compare the diagnostic utility of images from different modalities.
  • Use image processing software to enhance clinical images.
  • Appreciate the interdisciplinary nature of medical imaging.
  • Critically evaluate scientific and medical literature.
  • Analyze complex issues in diagnostic imaging.
  • Organize and express ideas clearly and convincingly in oral and written forms.

BIOL 435 - ETHNOBOTANY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Reflect (using extensive written assignments) on the cultural concepts around the perception of plants.
  • Apply acquired knowledge to examine the traditional uses of plants in tribal peoples.
  • Analyze impacts of modern human societies on traditional cultures and natural habitat as well as the global movement of plants and human cultures.
  • Compare the wisdom in both traditional and Western forms of medicine.
  • Reflect upon the role of plants in symbolism, ritual, and religion.
  • Appraise the role of plants in modern technology.
  • Outcome 4.2 Write effectively in various forms.
  • Integrate content, ideas, and approaches from integrative perspectives across disciplines.

BIOL 450 - ICHTHYOLOGY: THE BIOLOGY OF FISHES

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain the progression and major steps in fish evolution.
  • Describe and apply the classification system of fishes.
  • Apply basic physiological and ecological concepts to fishes.
  • Identify major fish groups and local native species, and describe their key characteristics.
  • Identify human impacts on fish populations, and the ecosystems in which they live.

BIOL 451 - ORNITHOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the current theories on the evolution and diversification of birds.
  • State the basic physiological and behavioral adaptations of birds .
  • Explain the basic ecological dynamics of birds .
  • Identify the current conservation concerns about birds and how they might address these concerns .
  • Differentiate Californian bird species.

BIOL 452 - ENTOMOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of beneficial and pest insects to humans.
  • Match inset morphology with their ecological function.
  • Outline the classification and major evolutionary trends among the insect orders.
  • Properly mount and preserve insect specimens.
  • Identify insect orders and important families.

BIOL 453 - METHODS IN POPULATION AND COMMUNITY ECOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Outline the mechanisms regulating populations and communities.
  • Describe population and community dynamics using mathematical models.
  • Know how to analyze ecological datasets using appropriate techniques and software.
  • Summarize and interpret the primary literature in ecology.

BIOL 464 - MEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain the principles and basic concepts of modern clinical imaging equipment.
  • Define the facets of image quality and identify the components contributing to them.
  • Compute transmission time of an image over a network.
  • Explain the factors determining image quality in digital fluoroscopy.
  • Outline the features of x-ray sources, detectors, collimators, and display systems used in x-ray CT.
  • Describe the different approaches to the reconstruction of CT images from projection measurements.
  • Characterize the properties of an ultrasound transducer, and its utility within an ultrasound imaging system.
  • Describe the three modes of ultrasound imaging.
  • Explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance.
  • Explain the pulsing and signal acquisition scheme used in three common pulse sequences.

BIOL 470 - PLANT PATHOLOGY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the living and non-living causal agents that cause plant diseases.
  • Explain the interactions between pathogens and the environmental conditions that initiate plant disease.
  • Describe methods of preventing, managing, or alleviating the damage of plant disease.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the human activites that result in disease epidemics in crop plants.

BIOL 471 - SOIL SCIENCE

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Understand the concepts and methodologies of soil quality and health necessary for applying it to agriculture, rangeland, and other ecosystems.
  • Understand the relationship between soil properties, soil function, and management choices for productivity, sustainability, and environmental quality.
  • Describe the function of soils (soil capacity, use, or management) in regards to (1) plant and animal productivity, (2) water and air quality, and (3) human health and habitation.
  • Understand the role and fate of organic chemicals in soil.
  • Recognize the role of microorganisms in soil systems and in the transformation of soil carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and phosphorous cycles.

BIOL 472 - INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain how pesticide resistance develops.
  • Outline the ecological principles that integrated pest management is based upon.
  • Understand how pest biology and behavior influences the outcome of management practices.
  • Compare and contrast integrated pest management practices to conventional pest control.
  • Apply current integrative pest management principles to local agricultural systems.

BIOL 473 - SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Describe the principles of sustainability in relation to agricultural practices.
  • Identify drought-tolerant crops and management practices.
  • Compare and contrast local and global agricultural systems.
  • Analyze the potential impacts of climate change on agriculture and food security.
  • Design and maintain an ecologically balanced garden.

BIOL 474 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify new developments in agricultural production systems.
  • Reflect on scientific, social, and economic impacts of emerging technology and practices.
  • Identify topic-appropriate research materials.
  • Synthesize information from a variety of sources.
  • Report on chosen topic in written and oral form.

BIOL 490 - SPECIAL TOPICS

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify topic appropriate research materials.
  • Synthesize information from a variety of sources.
  • Report on chosen topic in written and oral form.

BIOL 491 - SPECIAL LABORATORY TOPICS

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify topic appropriate research materials.
  • Synthesize information from a variety of sources.
  • Report on chosen topic in written and oral form.

BIOL 492 - INTERNSHIP

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Explain the processes and methods used in industrial and/or research settings.
  • Apply the concepts and principles learned in biology courses to the industrial and/or research arena.
  • Design experiments to test scientific hypotheses.
  • Analyze data and apply appropriate statistical tests.
  • Evaluate research outcomes.

BIOL 494 - INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Design and carry out experiments.
  • Identify topic appropriate research materials.
  • Synthesize information from a variety of sources.
  • Report on chosen topic in written and oral form.

BIOL 497 - DIRECTED STUDY

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify topic appropriate research materials.
  • Synthesize information from a variety of sources.
  • Report on chosen topic in written and oral form.

BIOL 499 - SENIOR CAPSTONE

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Discuss and critique scientific journal articles.
  • Apply knowledge and skills from previous coursework to interpret scientific literature.
  • Identify topic appropriate research materials.
  • Write a paper that synthesizes information from multiple sources.
  • Report on a topic in oral form.
  • Discuss societal issues related to biological science.